Wood Species

Because wood is a product of nature, the grain, density and color varies from tree to tree. The effect of nature’s variations is a product with character that has been highly sought after for generations. Color match and grain patterns will vary and are considered part of the beauty of real wood.

Cherry

Cherry is generally straight grained with a fairly uniform texture and a rich luster. Its hardness and weight are moderate and it is a fairly stable wood species. It polishes to an excellent finish that darkens considerably with age and exposure to sunlight. Stain colors are typically darker because of the reddish brown tone of the wood. Cherry is one of the most highly prized cabinet woods in North America.

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Birch

Birch is closed grained and has a slightly courser texture than maple\. It is a moderately hard wood. Birch finishes smoothly and it takes stain quite uniformly. The predominant sapwood color is white to creamy yellow, while the heartwood varies in color from medium or dark brown to reddish-brown.

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Maple

Maple has a straight closed grain with a fine uniform texture. It is a heavy, hard, strong wood
predominantly off-white in color, although it also contains light hues of yellow-brown and pink. Maple
occasionally contains small mineral, light tan or reddish -tinged streaks that will darken with stain. Maple
has excellent resistance to abrasion and indentation. It takes stain satisfactorily and polishes well.

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Hickory

Hickory is open grained with a coarse texture. It is very hard wood which makes it extremely tough and
resilient. In lighter stains it is not uncommon to see color from light to deep brown as well as mineral
streaks giving it a rustic appearance. It polishes to a nice shiny finish.

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Rustic Alder

Rustic Alder is a soft, light even textured wood with knots but no distinct grain pattern. It is consistent in
color, a pale pinkish brown to almost white. Rustic alder creates a very popular knotty look but is
somewhat susceptible to small dings and dents.

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Red Oak

Oak is a strong, hard, durable open grained wood with a course texture. Colors range from white to
yellow and pink. Oak finishes well with most stains and often has a unique look due to the open grain. It
is a very resilient wood species.

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Parawood

Parawood is a very hard, open-grained, pale yellow wood similar to mahogany. Parawood trees are
grown commercially for latex production. Once the tree ceases to produce sufficient quantities of latex it
is cut for processing in the manufacture of wood products and a new tree is planted in its place.
Parawood takes stain very consistently, is durable and holds up well under most conditions.

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Thermofoil

Thermofoil doors are created in a process that uses heat and pressure to bond a thin vinyl material to a
substrate, usually Medium Density Fiberboard (MDF). Since the film is so thin, it can bond to very
intricate shapes. This allows the process to be used on raised panels, routed edges and other designs
that cannot be coated with other types of laminates. Thermofoil doors are durable and easy to clean and
maintain.

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Glazing

The glazing process is probably the most important and valuable technique in the art of finishing fine
furniture. The glaze is hand applied to each and every component. You can expect your glazed cabinets
to vary slightly from one another adding to the unique character of each piece. The raised panels and
detailed edges used in the construction on the product allow the stain to “hang-up” and settle into the
seams and give the feeling of depth and dimension.